Nobel prize winner David Macmillan biography, wife

Nobel prize winner David Macmillan biography, wife

David William Cross MacMillan FRS FRSE is a Scottish-American chemist who is currently the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, where he also served as Chair of the Department of Chemistry from 2010 to 2015. He and Benjamin List shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2021 for “the development of asymmetric organocatalysis.” David MacMillan has a wonderful wife and is happily married. Scroll down to know more about David Macmillan biography, age, wife, wedding, and many more:

David Macmillan biography: Age, parents, Nationality, Education

Nobel prize winner David Macmillan Source: wsj.com

According to a David Macmillan biography, MacMillan was born on March 16, 1968, in Bellshill, Scotland. There is nothing known about his parents or siblings. He was born in the United Kingdom and is a British citizen. He has spent a considerable portion of his life in the United States of America as part of his research and profession. His zodiac sign is Pisces.

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He studied chemistry as an undergraduate at the University of Glasgow, where he collaborated with Ernie Colvin. He left the UK in 1990 to commence his doctoral studies at the University of California, Irvine, under the supervision of Professor Larry Overman. During this time, he concentrated on developing new chemical methodologies for stereocontrolled synthesis of bicyclic tetrahydrofurans. The entire synthesis of 7-()-deacetoxyalcyonin acetate, a eunicellin diterpenoid discovered from the soft coral Eunicella stricta, was the culmination of MacMillan’s graduate study. In 1996, he received his Ph.D.

His professional career and research 

MacMillan accepted a position at Harvard University with Professor David Evans after getting his Ph.D. In July 1998, MacMillan joined the chemistry faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, where he began his independent research career. In June 2000, he joined Caltech’s chemistry department, where his research group focused on new approaches to enantioselective catalysis. He was named the Earle C. Anthony Professor of Chemistry in 2004. In September 2006, he was named the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Princeton University.

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MacMillan’s lab has made significant progress in the field of asymmetric organocatalysis, and they’ve used these novel techniques to synthesize a variety of complicated natural compounds. [From 2010 to 2014, Professor MacMillan served as the inaugural Editor-in-Chief of Chemical Science, the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship general chemistry publication.

Benjamin List and David W.C. MacMillan share Chemistry Nobel for developing tool for building molecules

Benjamin List and David W.C. MacMillan won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developing a new tool for building molecules, work that has aided medicinal research and allowed scientists to create catalysts with far less environmental impact. The advancement has had a significant impact on pharmaceutical research and drug manufacturing, and has “made chemistry greener.”

According to the award-giving committee, “this has had a significant impact on pharmaceutical research and has made chemistry greener.” The two scientists will be awarded gold medals and a prize fund of ten million Swedish kronor will be split between them (about Rs 8.5 crore).

Who is David Macmillan wife? Is the Nobel prize winner married?

David MacMillan has a great wife and is happily married. He appears to be very private about his personal life, as he has not revealed any information about his wife or children. According to a Chemical Science Blog interview with MacMillan, he spends his free time with his family because he doesn’t get much of it due to his work.

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In 2004, he was named Earle C. Anthony Professor of Chemistry. For personal reasons, he moved to Princeton University in September 2006. In the realm of asymmetric organocatalytic, MacMillan’s lab has made great success, and they’ve used these unique techniques to synthesis a range of complex natural chemicals.

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