American middle-distance runner Emma Coburn net worth

American middle-distance runner Emma Coburn net worth

Emma Coburn is a middle-distance runner from the United States who excels in the steeplechase over 3000 meters.She became the first American woman to win a World Championship gold medal in the steeplechase. Coburn won a bronze medal in the 2016 Olympic Games in the 3000-meter steeplechase, setting an American record of 9:07.63. Coburn qualified for her third Olympic Games in 2021 by winning the 3000m at the American trials in Eugene, OR in June 2021, with a time of 9:09:41. Emma Coburn crossed the line in 14th place but then found out she’d been disqualified because she stepped off the track after a last-lap stumble over the barrier. How much is Emma Coburn networth? Scroll down to know more about Emma Coburn net worth, earnings, income, and many more: 

Emma Coburn net worth, earnings, income, and all the ways she makes her fortune

Emma Coburn net worth
US runner Emma Coburn at her home Source: Instagram

She is one of America’s most well-known athletes. Emma’s earnings are made up of prize money and the money she earns from her contracts. Her endorsement arrangements are also profitable. The gorgeous runner is a six-time All-American and three-time NCAA champion (two steeplechase titles and one indoor mile title). Emma Coburn net worth is estimated to be at $4 million dollars. Coburn qualified for her third Olympic Games in 2021 by winning the 3000m in the American trials in Eugene, OR in June 2021, in a time of 9:09:4. Emma Coburn finished 14th but was disqualified after stepping off the track after a last-lap stumble over the fence.

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Coburn won the 3000 meters steeplechase in a time of 9.02.58 seconds at the 2017 World Championships in London, breaking her own American record. She became the first American woman to win a World Championship gold medal in the steeplechase.  Emma won a bronze medal in the 2016 Olympic Games in the 3000-meter steeplechase, setting an American record of 9:07.63. She was also the first American woman to win a medal in that event at the Olympics.  Other notable performances include a silver medal at the 2019 World Championships, a place in 2012 Olympic final (8th), and appearances in the World Championship finals in 2011 (10th) and 2015. (5th).

Collage career

Coburn is a six-time All-American and three-time NCAA champion (two steeplechase titles and one indoor mile title). Coburn won the Pac-12 steeplechase title as a sophomore and finished second in the NCAA championships while at the University of Colorado in 2010. Emma won the Pac-12 indoor 3000-meter title and the Pac-12 and NCAA outdoor 3000-meter steeplechase titles as a junior in 2011. Coburn won the 2011 USA outdoor steeplechase title and qualified for the 2011 World Championships in the steeplechase, finishing 12th in the final.

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With a run of 9:25.28 in her first steeplechase of the 2012 season, Coburn became the fourth-fastest American in history and the fastest American on American territory. Coburn, who redshirted the 2012 outdoor season at Colorado to focus on the Olympic Trials, set a new personal best of 12 seconds. On April 30, 2013, Coburn was named the Pac-12 Track Athlete of the Week after setting the world record for the 3,000 steeplechases for the season.

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When did she start her career?

Coburn and her University of Colorado colleague Shalaya Kipp qualified for the 2012 U.S. Olympic squad in the 3000-meter steeplechase. At the 2012 Olympics, Coburn was the American team’s youngest runner, at the age of 21. She finished third in her Olympic heat with a time of 9:27.51, qualifying for the final. She finished 9th in the final with a time of 9:23.54, which was a personal best at the time. Coburn’s 3000 m steeplechase best was improved four times in 2014. She raced 9:19.81 at the Shanghai Diamond League event before improving to 9:17.84 in Eugene and 9:19.72 in Sacramento to earn her third US title.

Coburn’s indoor mile was ranked 28th in the world in 2015. Coburn qualified for the Olympics in the 1500m with a performance of 4:05.1 at the Prefontaine meet in Eugene, Oregon, in May. She qualified for the 2015 World Championships in Athletics by winning the steeplechase at the 2015 USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships. Coburn debuted her outdoor season on May 5, 2017, in the IAAF Diamond League 2017 Doha Qatar Athletic Super Grand Prix, where she finished fifth in the steeplechase in 9:14. On August 11, she won gold at the 2017 World Championships in London.

On June 30, 2019, she ran 9:04.90 to place second behind world record-holder Beatrice Chepkoech in the Prefontaine Classic’s star-studded Diamond League steeple in Stanford, California. Coburn ran a time of 9:25.63 at the 2019 USA Track & Field Outdoor Championships on July 28. She received an automatic qualifier for the 2019 World Championships because she was the defending World Champion in 2017. Courtney Frerichs, the American record holder, finished second in 9:26.61 and qualified for the World Championships in Doha, Qatar, in September.

Coburn qualified for her third Olympic Games in 2021 by winning the 3000m in the American trials in Eugene, OR in June with a time of 9:09:41.

Emma Coburn’s Workout and Diet Routine

One of her most recent movies is about the different functional movements that practically every tuner performs on a daily basis. Every day, she motivates her fans by publishing something new and amazing that can help them achieve their own personal objectives and improve their performance. Even better, you don’t need any particular equipment to do this, and you can do it at home or at a park! Even whether you’re new to running or any other type of sport, she believes that consistency is crucial. It all comes down to how your body reacts to certain situations. “She says,

“I think consistency is the most important thing for new runners. Get in a routine, commit to running four to five days a week, every week, for six weeks and you will start to love it and your body will adapt to it. Running is hard and can be miserable some days, but I truly believe that it’s the best workout out there.”

 “I run 10-15 hours a week, do about three hours of drills a week, and three hours of weights. My training as a distance runner is primarily cardio, but it is important to incorporate drills and weights to stay healthy and to build lean muscle.”

Running is her first and foremost thing to do for her practice, but then there is also building stamina which comes with strength exercises. She says, 

“Running is my full-time job, but I do like to support my running by going to the gym and lifting weights. I lift 3 times a week and found that it really makes me feel better on my runs. It keeps me healthy and feeling strong.” 

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